The World

Autodrive
In Federated Europe, all commercial vehicles which operate across national borders are required to have autodrive. Most states require private vehicles to be equipped with the system as well, and for the past two years the system has been required on all new vehicles manufactured within Federated Europe.
Autodrive allows a vehicle’s onboard computer system to take control of the vehicle in emergency situations. Acting much more swiftly and with better judgement than the average human driver, autodrive systems have been proven to reduce not only the severity but the number of traffic accidents.
In most major cities, autodrive is also used to gather information about traffic conditions, which is then fed to the traffic management computers. Several cities have experimented with a system which allows the traffic management computers to control the vehicles directly, but none have yet been fully implemented.
Most member states have systems which allow police to use autodrive to disable a vehicle or force it to pull over.

Maglev
Germany and France both launched ambitious programs to construct a network of high-speed maglev trains servicing major cities with associated airports, to be expanded into full national systems over a period of seven years. Mired in funding approval and environmental impact assessment processes, both systems now lie abandonded, largely constructed but totally unused.

MinTruk
Actually the name of an early manufacturer, “Mintruk” has become a general term for the most common form of road freight transport in Federated Europe; robotic vehicles which fit under one, or a series of, standardized cargo containers or containers with the same dimensions. They are widely used for both long-haul transport and intracity deliveries. Typically MinTruk are very nimble, with independently driven, individually steerable wheels, allowing them to make the most of the narrow spaces of most European cities as well as busy shipping yards and manufacturing sites.

The World

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